Canadian Children's Rights Council
Conseil canadien des droits des enfants
Newspaper Articles Archive 2020

Newspaper Articles Archive 2020

The Canadian Press

Unmarried Ontario couple had no children and no house but man must still pay support, appeal court rules

In Ontario, being common-law spouses doesn't necessarily mean having lived in the same home, the court found

The Canadian Press, by Colin Perkel, September 10, 2020

TORONTO - A wealthy businessman will have to pay more than $50,000 a month in spousal support for 10 years to a woman with whom he had a long-term romantic relationship even though they kept separate homes and had no children together, Ontario’s top court has ruled.

Under Ontario law, an unmarried couple are considered common-law spouses if they have cohabited - lived together in a conjugal relationship - continuously for at least three years. But that doesn’t necessarily mean living in the same home, the court found.

"Lack of a shared residence is not determinative of the issue of cohabitation," the Appeal Court said. "There are many cases in which courts have found cohabitation where the parties stayed together only intermittently."

The decision comes in the case of Lisa Climans and Michael Latner, both of Toronto, who began a romantic relationship after meeting in October 2001. At the time, she was 38 and separated with two children, court records show. He was 46 and divorced with three children.

Although they maintained their separate homes, Latner and Climans behaved as a couple both privately and publicly. They vacationed together. He gave her a 7.5-carat diamond ring and other jewelry that she wore. She quit her job and would regularly sleep at his house. They travelled together and talked about living together.

Latner proposed several times and Climans accepted. He often referred to her by his last name. However, he insisted she sign a marriage contract and came up with several drafts. She refused. Read More ..


The Canadian Press

B.C. legislation would keep addicted youth in care for maximum of seven days

VICTORIA - The mother of a teen who fatally overdosed says legislation in British Columbia that would allow youth to be involuntarily hospitalized for up to a week must be backed up with more residential treatment beds.

The Canadian Press, By Camille Bains in Vancouver, June 23, 2020

VICTORIA - The mother of a teen who fatally overdosed says legislation in British Columbia that would allow youth to be involuntarily hospitalized for up to a week must be backed up with more residential treatment beds.

Rachel Staples, whose 15-year-old son Elliot Eurchuk died in April 2018, said short-term emergency care meant to stabilize youth is just a start in addressing the overdose crisis among young people.

"They don't have the facilities to accommodate what's going on in our province," she said Tuesday, adding wait times could be as long as four months.

"A week in a hospital just makes a kid angry. Say they do decide 'Yeah, I want out of this nightmare.' Then what? They need residential treatment where they can be monitored." Read More..


Townhall

If Black Lives Matter, Black Dads Must Matter

Townhall, USA, Opinion, Dr. Warren Farrell, June 19, 2020

Loving African-American lives as much as we love the lives of others clearly includes addressing systemic racism. And it also means addressing the way America treats black men versus African-American women: African-American men are stopped by, shot by, and killed by police more than 20 times as frequently as African-American women. And the Bureau of Justice Statistics reports that African-American men are 25 times more likely to be imprisoned.

If disproportionately killing and imprisoning African-Americans is racist, then disproportionately killing and imprisoning males is sexist. But the real sexism is caring only about the systemic racism, and turning a blind eye to the other half of systemic: the sexism. The other half of "African-American male" is male.

Caring about Black boys and men quickly reveals there is no community that has been harder hit by dad-deprivation than the African-American community. It wasn’t always this way. Between 1880 and 1960, a majority of African-American families consisted of married fathers and mothers. But in the early sixties, nuclear families dramatically decreased. Inner city poverty and crime dramatically increased.

In 1965 sociologist Daniel Moynihan, who served under Presidents Nixon, Kennedy, and Johnson, led an investigation of inner-city life that concluded that the main predictor of growing up poor was not race per se but being born to parents who are not married. Why? A predictable outcome of no marriage was little or no father involvement.

While the Moynihan Report identified the quarter of black children born outside marriage as a crisis in 1965, the government’s counterproductive solution-giving moms money for not being married to dads-has contributed to almost a tripling of unmarried births among blacks (from 25 to 72 percent) and an expansion of the problem to white and Hispanic communities. The percentage of white children born outside marriage is now 36 percent-a nearly twelvefold increase from the 3.1 percent that it was in 1965. Read More ..


Washington Examiner

Boys' next sense of purpose: 'Father warriors'

Opinion - by Dr Warren Farrell, The Washington Examiner, Washington DC, USA, Sunday, June 14, 2019

With Father's Day approaching, we are in need of clarifying how the role of dads in the past and present can prepare us for developing the best dads for our children's future.

Historically, each generation had its war. In each generation, a boy received "social bribes" such as being considered a "hero" if he risked dying so others could live. He soon absorbed that if he risked being disposable, his parents would be proud and that girls were more attracted to an "Officer and a Gentleman" than a "Private and a Pacifist." Serving either in war, or as his family's sole breadwinner, gave a boy his mandate for manhood - his "sense of purpose" as a man.

Today, the good news is both that fewer boys are needed to be disposable in war and that more women are sharing the burdens of the breadwinner role. The bad news is that this has left many boys with a "purpose void." As boys with a purpose void have become less-motivated men, more women are interested in having children without having "just one more child I have to support." Additionally, more children of divorce are raised without dads.

The result has been a global boy crisis in all 56 of the largest developed nations: of boys falling behind girls in virtually every area of academic achievement, mental health, physical health, and economic competence. But there is a gap: Boys with two involved parents are doing fine; boys whose dads are absent are not.

If the boy crisis resides where dads do not reside, this creates a new opportunity for consideration this Father's Day: Our sons can fill their purpose void by being honored as warriors not just if they risk killing and being killed overseas, but also if they become "father warriors" by loving and being loved at home. Read More ..


Vancouver police investigating after dead baby found in Downtown Eastside

Vancouver Sun, Tiffany Crawford, April 24, 2020

Vancouver police are investigating after a dead baby was found in a portable toilet in the Downtown Eastside on Wednesday night.

Flowers mark the spot at Hastings and Main streets in Vancouver, BC Thursday afternoon April 23, 2020 where a baby was found deceased inside a portable toilet late Wednesday. Police are investigating. Photo by Jason Payne

"This is, without a doubt, an extremely tragic incident," said Vancouver police Const. Tania Visintin in a statement Thursday.

Vancouver police investigating after dead baby found in Downtown Eastside on Wednesday night.

"This is, without a doubt, an extremely tragic incident," said Vancouver police Const. Tania Visintin in a statement Thursday. Read Me ..


Alyson Schafer - parent educator - corporal punishment of children and discipline

Alyson Schafer on Spanking and Corporal Punishment of Children

Alyson Schafer is a psychotherapist and one of Canada's leading parenting experts. She's the author of the best-selling "Breaking the Good Mom Myth" (Wiley, 2006) and host of TV's The Parenting Show a live call-in show in Toronto, Ontario.

The media relies on Alyson's comments and opinions. you can find her interviewed and quoted extensively in such publications as Cosmopolitan, Readers' Digest, Canadian Living, Today's Parents, and Canadian Families.

You can read Alyson's thoughts. Read More ..

Auditor General Ontario

Auditor General of Ontario

Disasterous Report on the Family Reponsibility Office FRO 2010

80% of Telephone calls don't get answered

Payers and recipients do not have direct access to their assigned enforcement services officer

"There is only limited access to enforcement staff because many calls to the Office do not get through or are terminated before they can be answered."

"The Office is reviewing and working on only about 20% to 25% of its total cases in any given year."

"At the end of our audit in April 2010, there were approximately 91,000 bring-forward notes outstanding, each of which is supposed to trigger specific action on a case within one month. The status of almost one-third of the outstanding bring-forward notes was "open," indicating either that the notes had been read but not acted upon, or that they had not been read at all, meaning that the underlying nature and urgency of the issues that led to these notes in the first place was not known. In addition, many of the notes were between one and two years old."

"For ongoing cases, the Office took almost four months from the time the case went into arrears before taking its first enforcement action. For newly registered cases that went straight into arrears, the delay was seven months from the time the court order was issued."

Read the shocking report by The Auditor General of Ontario Report on the Family Responsibility Office

National Post

Ontario's child financial support collection agency has big problems

Ontario's Family Responsibility Office has many problems

Quote from Ontario Government Ombudsman -"an equal opportunity error-prone program,."'

Support recipients not getting their money.

Men who've been meeting their court-ordered obligations have trouble getting the FRO to stop taking payments when it's supposed to.   Read More ..

The Women's Post

"Canada's National newspaper for professional women"

Does the FRO have a feminist perspective?

When families fall apart, they can make for the bitterest of enemies. The intensity of their hostility, the personal rhetoric, the posturing and positioning, and the utter faithlessness of remembrance in the relationship's good deeds and consequences is a breathtaking phenomenon. It's as if the positive qualities and countless achievements are struck from history as a revisionist might strike the Holocaust. Into all of this the family court system wades, often inelegantly. Divorce lawyers drive up the emotional and financial toll of separation and transformation. Family and friends frequently collude to make things worse.

And when government decides to rear its head, well, it's a mess for all the world to see. Witness the recent attention on Ontario's euphemistically branded Family Responsibility Office. A job in advertising doubtlessly greeted the person who came up with its title, because it suggests some sort of feel-good missionary work to hold together the sanctity of the institution.   Read More ..

Women's Post Newspaper

"Canada's national newspaper for professional women"

The Family Responsibility Office Under Scrutiny

On June 9, 2005 the McGuinty government announced the passage of Bill 155, legislation that promised to increase enforcement, improve fairness and enhance efficiency at the Family Responsibility Office (FRO).

However, the legislation did not address the problem of accountability and, as things now stand, the FRO is a threat to every Canadian affected by a government regulated support and custody arrangement system. Think of George Orwell's 1984 and you'll have a good picture of how issues are handled at the FRO.

They have legal power to extort money from Canadians, but are not responsible or accountable for their actions.

Last year an FRO staff member decided not to wait for a court date to review the financial status of an out-of-work truck driver and took it upon themselves to suspend his license because he was, understandably, behind on his payments, having lost his job earlier in the year. Although he was looking for work, the FRO cut off the only way he knew of to earn a living. His suicide note explained how he'd lost all hope. Is this what we want FRO to be doing?  Read More ..

Wicked mum murdered son, 8, with electrical cables after he caught her in sex romps with his granddad

The Mirror, UK, October 19 2016

Vicious Veronica Panarello throttled her son Loris to death and abandoned his body in a remote gully after he found out about the fling.

Veronica Panarello, the mother-killer

The "manipulative" mum,  wept as she was jailed for 30 years at a court in Italy on Monday

 

A wicked mum who brutally murdered her eight-year-old son after he allegedly discovered she was having an affair with his grandfather has been jailed.

Vicious Veronica Panarello throttled her son Loris Stival with electrical cables and abandoned his body in a remote gully after he found out about the fling.

The "manipulative" mum wept as she was jailed for 30 years at a court in Italy on Monday.

Panarello, 28, had tried to pretend her son had been abducted to cover up the horrendous killing in November 2014.

Panarello throttled her eight-year-old son Loris to death with electrical cables. Read More ..

Canadian Press - New Brunswick woman ruled responsible in burning of baby's body

New Brunswick woman ruled responsible in burning of baby's body

ST. STEPHEN, N.B. - A New Brunswick judge says a woman who burned and dismembered her newborn son is criminally responsible for her actions.

Becky Sue Morrow earlier pleaded guilty to offering an indignity to a dead body and disposing of a newborn with the intent of concealing a delivery.

Judge David Walker ruled Friday that the 27-year-old woman may have been suffering from a mental disorder when she delivered the baby but that that was not the case when the baby's body was burned and its remains hidden.

It is not known if the baby was alive at the time of birth.

At a hearing last month, the court heard contrasting reports from the two psychiatrists. One said Ms. Morrow was in a "disassociated" mental state when the crime occurred. The other said she clearly planned her actions and understood the consequences.

Canada's
national "Child Day"

November 20th

Canada's "Child Day" is held on November 20th each year as designated by the Parliament of Canada in 1993.

It commemorates the United Nations adoption of two landmark documents concerned with the human rights of all children and youths.  Read More ..