Canadian Children's Rights Council - Conseil canadien des droits des enfants
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Canadian Children's Rights Council - Conseil canadien des droits des enfants

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WOMEN:
THE FORGOTTEN CHILD MURDERERS

Women who kill their children are given sympathy and sentenced to "treatment" while men who do the same thing are charged with murder and sentenced to life.

Perhaps it is not a coincidence that women are many times more likely to murder their offspring than men.  More ..

Child / Youth - Homicide / Murder Statistics Canada

Statistics Canada - Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics

Child / Youth Murder / Homicide Statistics in Canada

According to Statistics Canada, the Government of Canada's statistics agency, when a child is murdered in Canada, it's usually at the hands of a relative, not a stranger.

Family members were found guilty in almost two-thirds (63 per cent) of the 1,990 solved cases of children and youth homicides in Canada between 1974 and 1999, according to Statistics Canada. Twenty-seven per cent of the murders were committed by acquaintances, and only 10 per cent by strangers.

When it comes to parents killing their own children, the number of mothers accused almost equals the number of fathers accused. Between 1974 and 2000, 460 fathers and stepfathers were accused of killing their children, compared to 400 mothers and stepmothers, according to Statistics Canada.


2003

There were 33 homicides committed against children under the age of 12 in 2003, the lowest number in over 25 years. Of these victims, 14 (or 42%) were under one year of age.

Of the 27 solved homicides against children, 23 were killed by a parent: 9 by a father, 4 by a step-father, 10 by a mother and 1 by a step-mother (in one incident, both parents were accused). In addition, 2 children were killed by their day-care provider and 2 by a stranger.

Considering Canada's population of 33 million people, there are, thankfully, very few children murdered.


2006

In 2006, there were 60 homicides committed against children and youth under the age of 18 across Canada.

36 of these homicides of children and youth were committed by family members in 2006, compared to 16 committed by non-family members (including acquaintances and friends) . The remaining 8 child homicides were unsolved.

With few exceptions, the rate of child and youth homicides perpetrated by family members has been consistently higher than the rate committed by non-family members (Chart 4.4). The family rate decreased in 2005 to just over 3 homicides per million children and youth, the lowest rate in 33 years.

CanadianCRC editor's comments:
The percentage figures listed by Statistics Canada - Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics are statistically meaningless since the actual numbers are statistically very low. The up and downs in the chart below are of little value becuase of the low actual number of deaths.

Notes: Excludes homicides for which police reported the accused-victim relationship as unknown. Rates are calculated per million children and youth (0 to 17 year olds) using population estimates provided by Statistics Canada, Census and Demographic Statistics, Demography Division.
Source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Homicide Survey.

Parents responsible for most family-related homicides against children and youth

The majority of family perpetrated homicides against children under 18 years of age are committed by parents. Over the past three decades (1977 to 2006), 90% of family-related homicide victims under the age of 18 were killed by a parent (includes step and adopted parents but excludes other "social" parents such as foster parents).

CanadianCRC editors comments:
Note the headline below provide by Statistics Canada which states that fathers are responsible for more child murders than mothers. Both numbers are very low. We looked into the statistics. We found that the rate of murders committed by biological mothers and biological fathers are nearly identical and very low number considering the total population of children.

Statistics Canada included step fathers in the 'fathers' statistics while not including step-mothers in the 'mother ' statistics.  We attribute this disprepancy to feminist influence whish is prevalent in the agencies of the Government of Canada. Trying to prove that men are more violent to children than women is a key strategy to support funding of women's groups across Canada while the Goverment of Canada doesn't fund any men's groups.

Statistics Canada states:

Between 1997 and 2006, 56% of children killed by a family member were killed by their fathers ( both biological and step-fathers), 33% by their biological mothers, and the remaining 10% by other family members including step-mothers, siblings, grandparents, cousins or other extended family.

Notes: Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding. Based upon a subset consisting of those victims who were killed by one person, representing 95% of the total number of family-related homicides against children and youth from 1997 to 2006. Mothers and fathers include biological, step, adoptive and foster parents. ???Other family??? includes siblings, cousins and any other family member related to the victim by blood, marriage or adoption.
Source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Homicide Survey.

Infants are at greatest risk of homicide by a family member

Between 1997 and 2006, about one-quarter (26%) of children and youth killed by a family member were infants (under the age of one year). Baby boys tend to be at somewhat greater risk than baby girls. During the most recent 10-year period, the rate of baby boys killed by a family member averaged 35 per million male infants, compared to 27 per million female infants (Chart 4.6).

Chart 4.6 Infants are at greatest risk of homicide by a family member, 1997 to 2006

Note: Rates are calculated per million children and youth (0 to 17 year olds) according to the applicable age group and sex category using population estimates provided by Statistics Canada, Census and Demographic Statistics, Demography Division.
Source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Homicide Survey.

The methods used in family-related homicides against children under the age of 18 varied depending on the age of the victim (Table 4.5). Family members who kill young children (0 to 6 years of age) are most likely to use physical force (e.g. strangulation, beating or Shaken Baby Syndrome). Older children and youth (7 to 17 years of age) are most likely to be killed with a weapon (e.g. knife or firearm).